The United States Government Is Now Using Electronic Surveillance To Track Inocent Citizens Movements

In this undated photo provided by Yasir Afifi, shows a GPS monitoring device he found on his car in Santa Clara, Calif. Afifi took his car in for an oAP – In this undated photo provided by Yasir Afifi, shows a GPS monitoring device he found on his car in Santa …
SAN FRANCISCO – Yasir Afifi, a 20-year-old computer salesman andcommunity college student, took his car in for an oil change earlier this month and his mechanic spotted an odd wire hanging from the undercarriage.
The wire was attached to a strange magnetic device that puzzled Afifi and the mechanic. They freed it from the car and posted images of it online, asking for help in identifying it.
Two days later, FBI agents arrived at Afifi's Santa Clara apartment and demanded the return of their property — a global positioning system tracking device now at the center of a raging legal debate over privacy rights.
One federal judge wrote that the widespread use of the device was straight out of George Orwell's novel, "1984".
"By holding that this kind of surveillance doesn't impair an individual's reasonable expectation of privacy, the panel hands the government the power to track the movements of every one of us, every day of our lives," wrote Alex Kozinski, the chief judge of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in a blistering dissent in which a three-judge panel from his court ruled that search warrants weren't necessary for GPS tracking.
But other federal and state courts have come to the opposite conclusion.
Law enforcement advocates for the devices say GPS can eliminate time-consuming stakeouts and old-fashioned "tails" with unmarked police cars. The technology had a starring role in the HBO cops-and-robbers series "The Wire" and police use it to track every type of suspect — from terrorist to thieves stealing copper from air conditioners.
That investigators don't need a warrant to use GPS tracking devices in California troubles privacy advocates, technophiles, criminal defense attorneys and others.
This is so Wrong:  What are we doing to ourselves people? We are letting the United States Government use electronic surveillance to track our movements.  That is a clear violation of your rights as a citizen of this country. I cannot believe that any court could side with warrentless devices being planted in peoples cars. 
I know they are going to say that the Patriot Act and Homeland Security give them the right to plant these GPS devices in peoples cars.

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